Add3.com

5 Guidelines for Effective Hashtag Marketing, According to Peter Stringer

Happy Spring and welcome to the April edition of ‘According To’! This month’s post is a great change of pace from previous posts in the series and features Peter Stringer, the Senior Director of Interactive Media for the Boston Celtics. Peter is providing his top five tips for effective hashtag marketing based on his experience with hashtag campaigns for the Celtics. Over the past two NBA seasons, Stringer has launched and cultivated social media channels for the Celtics. His efforts have led to over 6.4 million “Likes” on Facebook and over 470,000 followers on Twitter.

Peter Stringer, Boston Celtics

Of all the recent innovations in digital communications, the hashtag is among the most misunderstood and misused conventions. Without such a utility, many of the communities that exist on the social media platforms may never have materialized. Likeminded users would struggle to find each other, and it could be argued that the platform as a whole may have stagnated without some semblance of order that hashtags provided in the early days.

Five years later, the convention has morphed dramatically. Far too often, the hashtag is misused for attempts at humor, sarcasm, irony, or simply to avoid using spaces. But when used properly, hashtags are powerful tools for spreading your message, as well as measuring audience volume and sentiment. A well-promoted hashtag creates and curates online conversations about your topic, while categorizing that content for searches. There’s much to evaluate when launching a hashtag campaign. Since there’s no handbook, here are five guidelines for using hashtags in your marketing:

1. Keep them short and sweet
While there’s no official convention, I’d suggest that anything over 20 characters is way too long for a tag that you’re going to ask people to use and retweet. In general, shorter is better, as long as the tag is specific enough to be absolute in its meaning. About 10-15 characters is probably the sweet spot. After all, you’ve only got 140 characters to use, so the longer your tag is, the less room users will have to share meaningful thoughts about the topic.

2. Make them clear
You’d like to think it goes without saying, but casual twitter users too often create lengthy tags that convey little to no meta information about their tweet. In fact, usually the “hashtag” itself delivers more punch than the tweet. But the best hashtags are unambiguous.

  • For instance, Fox Sports recently used #Rivalry on screen during a Red Sox and Yankees national TV broadcast. While it was clear to viewers that Fox was referring to the age-old rivalry between the Red Sox and the Yankees, #Rivalry lacked context for Twitter users not watching the game; the hashtag was far too generic. Remember, hashtags on TV aren’t just for your viewers, but they’re also free advertising to reach potential viewers who will be exposed to your tag in their timeline.

3. Consider how it might be used against you
If you’re going to promote a hashtag, consider the fact that it could blow up in your face. Of all the classic examples, #McDStories is among the most notorious. The fast food giant’s detractors commandeered the generic tag by sharing horror stories about McDonald’s, turning their marketing dollars against them. Mitigate that risk by considering what might go wrong before handing your branding over to the public.

4. Promote it…without being obnoxious
Twitter users understand what a hashtag is when they see it, but not everyone is familiar with the platform. So while the hashtag should be prominent enough to be recognized, there’s still a universe out there that doesn’t even use or understand Twitter. Displaying your tag persistently on screen during a commercial or prominently in a print ad is an effective way to generate buzz and encourage use, but be mindful of cluttering your message with information that’s not necessarily relevant to a large portion of your audience.

  • Comedy Central was among the first media outlets to fully embrace the on-screen hashtag, tagging its Charlie Sheen Roast program with a #SheenRoast bug in the lower left hand corner of the entire broadcast. It was subtle, but effective. Similarly, NBC Sports is currently using the #StanleyCup hashtag just below their iconic peacock logo next to the score at the top of the screen, away from the on-ice action but conspicuous enough to generate plenty of activity.

5. Don’t expect it to trend
Set realistic expectations, and don’t gauge your success on whether or not your hashtag managed to trend. Most trending topics happen organically, briefly, and with little fanfare. Instead, set specific, measurable goals for engagement. Then analyze the number of users tweeting your tag, the nature of the conversation around your brand, and finally, identify commonalities among influencers participating in your campaign. Your most invested fans will likely join the conversation by using the tag you’ve provided, but how effective was your tag in reaching your existing audience, as well as a new audience?

Follow Peter on Twitter and check out his blog for some great social media tips!

Amplify Interactive offers Social Media Marketing Services for small to medium sized businesses. Contact us today to chat about your social media strategies!

Have you seen success in your social media efforts with the application of hashtags? Let us know in the comments if you have any tips that we didn’t cover that have been successful for you!

Ashley Kennedy

About Ashley Kennedy

Ashley is an Associate Account Director at the Add3 office in Portland. She specializes in PPC and Social Media. Outside of work, Ashley enjoys reading, going to the movies, taking pictures, and spending time with her family. She has an obsession with tumblr and enjoys going to concerts – especially anything country. Connect with Ashley on LinkedIn, Google+, or Twitter (be warned, she mainly tweets during Blazers and OSU Beaver games).